Workshop Faculty

Lee K. Abbott, Fiction

Lee K. Abbott is the author of Love is the Crooked Thing, Living After Midnight, Wet Places at Noon, and, most recently, All Things, All at Once: New & Selected Stories. His fiction and articles have appeared in Harper’s, Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times Book Review, and Southern Review, among others. For many years he taught at The Ohio State University, where he was a Humanities Distinguished Professor of English. His work has been included in Best American Short Stories and The O’Henry Awards.

David Baker, Poetry, Nature Writing

Among David Baker’s fourteen books are his most recent poetry collection, Never-Ending Birds (2009, W. W. Norton), winner of the 2011 Theodore Roethke Memorial Poetry Prize, and Talk Poetry: Poems and Interviews with Nine American Poets (2012, Arkansas). This latest title is cosponsored by The Kenyon Review and gathers Baker’s KROnline interviews with a number of important poets. For his work, Baker has been awarded fellowships and grants from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, Poetry Society of America, Ohio Arts Council, Society of Midland Authors, and others. He currently serves as Professor of English at Denison University where he holds the Thomas B. Fordham Chair of Creative Writing. He is the poetry editor of The Kenyon Review.

Joanna Klink, Poetry

klinkJoanna Klink is the author of They Are Sleeping (University of Georgia Press, 2000), Circadian (Penguin, 2007), Raptus (Penguin, 2010), and Excerpts from a Secret Prophecy (Penguin, 2015). Her poems have appeared in many anthologies, most recently The Penguin Anthology of Twentieth Century Poetry. She has received awards and fellowships from The Rona Jaffe Foundation, Jeannette Haien Ballard, Civitella Ranieri, and The American Academy of Arts and Letters. She is currently a visiting poet at Williams College.

Geeta Kothari, Literary Nonfiction

kothariGeeta Kothari is the nonfiction editor of the Kenyon Review. She is a two-time recipient of the fellowship in literature from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and the editor of “Did My Mama Like to Dance?” and Other Stories about Mothers and Daughters. Her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in various journals and anthologies, including the Kenyon Review, the Massachusetts Review, Fourth Genre, and Best American Essays. In 2004, she received the David and Tina Bellet Award for Teaching Excellence. In addition to teaching in the undergraduate curriculum, Geeta Kothari also directs the Writing Center.

E. J. Levy, Fiction

E. J. LevyE.J. Levy’s writing has been featured in Best American Essays, the New York Times, and Paris Review, among other publications, and has received a Pushcart Prize. Her debut story collection, Love, In Theory, won the 2012 Flannery O’Connor Award and 2014 Great Lakes Colleges Association’s New Writers Award (previously awarded to Alice Munro, Louise Erdrich, Richard Ford, and Mary Szybist for their first books); a French edition was released in 2015 by Editions Rivages to excellent reviews in Le Monde, Le Figaro, Elle, and was the featured title in the August issue of Paris Vogue. Her anthology, Tasting Life Twice: Literary Lesbian Fiction by New American Writers, won a Lambda Literary Award. She lives in Loveland, Colorado, with her partner and baby, and is on the MFA faculty at Colorado State University.

Rebecca McClanahan, Literary Nonfiction

Rebecca McClanahan’s tenth book is The Tribal Knot: A Memoir of Family, Community, and a Century of Change. She has also published five books of poetry, three books of writing instruction, and The Riddle Song and Other Rememberings, winner of the Glasgow Award in nonfiction. Her work has appeared in Best American Essays, Best American Poetry, The Kenyon Review, Gettysburg Review, the Sun, and numerous anthologies. The recipient of the Wood Prize from Poetry Magazine, a Pushcart Prize, and literary fellowships from New York Foundation for the Arts and the North Carolina Arts Council, McClanahan teaches in the MFA programs of Queens University (Charlotte) and Rainier Writing Workshop.

Dinty W. Moore, Literary Nonfiction

Dinty W. Moore’s memoir Between Panic & Desire (University of Nebraska) was winner of the Grub Street Nonfiction Book Prize in 2009. His other books include The Accidental Buddhist, Toothpick Men, The Emperor’s Virtual Clothes, and the writing guide, The Truth of the Matter: Art and Craft in Creative Nonfiction. Moore has published essays and stories in Southern Review, Georgia Review, Harpers, The New York Times Sunday Magazine, Philadelphia Inquirer Magazine, Gettysburg Review, Utne Reader, and Crazyhorse, among numerous other venues. A professor of nonfiction writing at Ohio University, Moore has won many awards for his writing, including a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Fiction.

Carl Phillips, Poetry

Carl Phillips is the author of 13 books of poems, most recently Reconnaissance (FSG, 2015). His honors include the Los Angeles Times Book Award, the Kingsley Tufts Award, the Kenyon Review Award for Literary Achievement, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Academy of American Poets, and the Library of Congress. His prose books are The Art of Daring: Risk, Restlessness, Imagination (Graywolf, 2014) and Coin of the Realm: Essays on the Life and Art of Poetry (Graywolf, 2004), and he has translated Sophocles’s Philoctetes (Oxford, 2004). Phillips is Professor of English at Washington University in St. Louis.

Natalie Shapero, Poetry

Natalie-shapero-448Natalie Shapero is the Professor of the Practice of Poetry at Tufts University and an editor at large of the Kenyon Review. Her first poetry collection, No Object, was published by Saturnalia Books in 2013, and her second collection is forthcoming from Copper Canyon Press. Natalie’s writing has appeared in The Nation, The New Republic, The New Yorker, Poetry, The Progressive, and elsewhere. Shapero holds degrees in creative writing and in law. She has worked as a litigation fellow with Americans United for Separation of Church and State, and she has taught at Kenyon College, the Ohio State University, and the Columbus College of Art and Design. Her awards include a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a Ruth Lilly Fellowship, a Kenyon Review Fellowship, and a Great Lakes College Association New Writers Award.

Nancy Zafris, Fiction

Nancy Zafris has taught at the Kenyon Review workshop for many years. Her latest book, The Home Jar, a collection of short stories, was published in 2013. She has also written The People I Know, winner of the Flannery O’Connor award for short fiction and the Ohioana Library prize, as well as the novels The Metal Shredders and Lucky Strike. She has received two National Endowment for the Arts grants and has taught in the Czech Republic as a Fulbright fellow. The former fiction editor of The Kenyon Review, she is now the series editor of The Flannery O’Connor award for short fiction.

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