Contributors

Kazim Ali is the author of eight books of poetry, fiction, and essays including, most recently, the cross-genre work Bright Felon: Autobiography and Cities and a translation of Iranian Sohrab Sepehri’s Water’s Footfall. He teaches creative writing and comparative literature at Oberlin College.

David Baker’s most recent books are Never-Ending Birds (poems, Norton, 2009) and Radiant Lyre (essays, ed. with Ann Townsend, Graywolf, 2007).

T. C. Boyle is the author of twenty-two books of fiction, including, most recently, After the Plague (2001), Drop City (2003), The Inner Circle (2004), Tooth and Claw (2005), The Human Fly (2005), Talk Talk (2006), The Women (2009), Wild Child (2010), andWhen the Killing’s Done (2011). He currently lives near Santa Barbara with his wife and three children.

Hayun Cho lives in Wilmette, Illinois, and is a junior at North Shore Country Day School. She especially enjoys poetry because it never ceases to surprise her. Hayun aspires to delve deeper into literature and creative writing in the near future.

Weston Cutter is from Minnesota, edits the book review site Corduroy Books, and had his debut collection of stories, You’d Be a Stranger, Too, published in late 2010. He has had work published recently in Post Road and Forklift, OH.

Talaya Delaney recently finished her PhD in the History of American Civilization Department at Harvard University. Her plays have been workshopped and performed in Germany, Ireland, and the United States. She currently lives and works in Chile.

Randy Fertel is the author of The Gorilla Man and the Empress of Steak: A New Orleans Family Memoir (University Press of Mississippi, October 2011). He has taught English at Harvard, Tulane, and others, and his work has appeared on NPR and in theHuffington PostCreative NonfictionSmithsonian, and Gastronomica.

Ted Kooser is a former U.S. poet laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner. His most recent book, written for children, is Bag in the Wind(Candlewick, 2010).

Natalie Landers has received two honorable mentions for nonfiction and poetry from the Literary Arts Awards Program of the Alabama Writers’ Forum, as well as an honorable mention for fiction in the 2011 Columbia College Young Authors writing competition.

Erin McGraw is the author of five books, most recently the novel The Seamstress of Hollywood Boulevard. She teaches at the Ohio State University and divides her time between Ohio and Tennessee.

Jeffrey Meyers is one of twelve Americans in the Royal Society of Literature. Thirty of his books have been translated into fourteen languages and seven alphabets and published on six continents.

Keya Mitra is an assistant professor of English at Gonzaga University. She received her MFA and PhD in creative writing at the University of Houston and was a 2008 Fulbright Scholar in creative writing in India. She has completed a short story collection and novel, and her work has appeared in Best New American Voices (2007), Torpedo (2008), and Event (2006), in addition to other publications.

Melinda Moustakis won the 2010 Flannery O’Connor Award in Short Fiction for her linked collection about a family in Alaska calledBear Down, Bear North that will be published by University of Georgia Press this fall and includes “Miners and Trappers.” Her stories are published or forthcoming in ConjunctionsNew England ReviewAmerican Short FictionAlaska Quarterly ReviewMassachusetts ReviewHobart, and elsewhere. She has been nominated for three Pushcart Prizes.

Emily Nason lives in Columbia, South Carolina, and is a senior creative writing student at the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities. She plans to study creative writing in college.

Katherine Painter lives in Missoula, Montana.

Eric Pankey is the author of eight collections of poetry, the most recent of which is The Pear as One Example: New and Selected Poems 1984-2008 (Ausable/Copper Canyon). A new collection, Dissolve, is forthcoming from Milkweed Editions.

Christopher Patton’s first book of poetry, Ox, was a finalist for the BC Book Prize for Poetry. Curious Masonry, a book of translations from the Anglo-Saxon, was recently published by Gaspereau Press. The poems here are from a manuscript in progress called Dumuzi.

Stanley Plumly’s most recent books are Old Heart (poems), 2007, and Posthumous Keats: A Personal Biography, 2008. This year he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Jean Portante, born in Luxembourg and living in Paris, is a poet, novelist, playwright, translator, and member of the Acadmie Mallarmé. His recent collection is La réinvention de l’oubli (Editions Le Castor Astral, 2010).

Zoë Skoulding’s most recent collection of poems is Remains of a Future City (Seven, 2008). She lectures in the School of English at Bangor University and is editor of the international quarterly Poetry Wales.

Mary Szybist’s first collection of poems, Granted, was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and her second collection,Incarnadine, is forthcoming from Graywolf Press in 2013. This fall, she is a resident at Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center. She teaches at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon.

Ann Townsend is the author of Dime Store Erotics and The Coronary Garden (poems) and editor of Radiant Lyre: Essays on Lyric Poetry (with David Baker). She directs the creative writing program at Denison University and is a founding member of VIDA: Women in Literary Arts.

Lionel Trilling (1905-1975) was an American literary critic, author, and University Professor at Columbia University. Among the most influential of his many works are two collections of essays, The Liberal Imagination and The Opposing Self; a critical study of E. M. Forster; and one novel, The Middle of the Journey.

James Trilling, the son of Lionel Trilling, was curator of Old World Textiles at the Textile Museum in Washington, D.C. and taught at the Rhode Island School of Design before he became a full-time independent scholar. He is the author of Ornament: A Modern Perspective and has written extensively on the subject of Byzantine art.

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