About Joseph Campana

Joseph Campana is a poet, critic, and scholar of Renaissance literature. He is the author of The Pain of Reformation: Spenser, Vulnerability, and the Ethics of Masculinity (Fordham UP, 2012), and two collections of poetry, The Book of Faces (Graywolf, 2005) and Natural Selections (2012), which received the Iowa Poetry Prize. His poems appear in Slate, The Kenyon Review, Poetry, Conjunctions, Colorado Review, and many other venues. He has received grants from the NEA and the Houston Arts Alliance. Current projects include a study of Shakespeare entitled The Child’s Two Bodies and a collection of poems entitled The Book of Life. He teaches literature and creative writing at Rice University. Find his website here.        

Cry Havoc

That special kind of attention the mind pays when it’s half-distracted: what is it called? I can’t say I know what it’s called when the poet stares at a sculpture an enters another world. Ekphrasis is an obvious choice, but…

Someone Wrote You a Letter

You know you should write but you don’t. I don’t. Let’s be clear: I’ve neglected my blog for weeks now, though I love it. And it took three weeks to send email notes to some people I met at a…

Someone Gives You a Poem

It’s not like getting a painting. To be fair, only once has anyone ever given me a painting. Imagine such a gift, especially if the work moves you. I’m imagining something else. I marvel at the ability to send images…

Mind of Winter

If anyone has one, a mind of winter, it’s Tomas Tranströmer. I’ve been thinking about his poems lately, how each seems to place the reader in a crystalline picture frame full of snow. His ardent admirers now have even more…

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